Dorchester Atheneum
Saturday, October 25, 2014
Search
Site Tips
> Home
> Agriculture
> Architecture
> Artists
> Authors
> Books
> Cemeteries
> Churches
   > First Church
   > Second Church
   > Third Church
   > First Methodist Episcopal Church
   > St. Mary's Church (Episcopal)
   > Congregation Mishkan Tefila
   > More on Churches..
> Dorchester Historical Society
> Entertainment
> Entertainers
> Industry & Commerce
> Institutions
> Maps
> Monuments
> Myths
> Postcard Images
> Public Figures
> Schools
> Town History
> Walking Tours
> 



Congregation Mishkan Tefila
Congregation-Mishkan Tefila
Click image for more information
 Congregation Mishkan Tefila

Located on Seaver Street facing Franklin Park, technically in Roxbury, this temple served people from the Grove Hall area, which extended into Dorchester.

In 2003 the building is used by the United House of Prayer for all People.

Reader's Comment
 Occasionally viewers of this site offer comments.

On August 28, 2005 Herculano Fecteau wrote


Re: Overview: Congregation Mishkan Tefila

It might be nice to mention that for a few decades the former Temple Mishkah Tefila was the home of the Elma Lewis School of Fine Arts, a center for African-American music and culture in Roxbury, operated under the leadership of Ms. Elma Lewis. Her long-running adaptation of Langston Hughes' gospel play, Black Nativity, is still a staple of Boston's cultural scene at Christmas, now presented under the direction of Ms. Lewis's longtime collaborator John Ross.


From: JOEL TENENBAUMAM Nov. 2007

CommentsTHE TEMPLE WAS VERY POPULAR AND I WENT TO IT IN THE 1950'S. THE CANTOR gREGOR sHELKIN WAS a NAZI SURVIVOR AND LATER BECAME cANTOR eMRITUS At at the TEMPLe IN bROOKLINE. HE WAS ONCE ON rRALPH EDWARDS 'this is your life." the rabbi was Kazis who also ran the Hebrew school right behind the temple.THE TEMPLE WAS BEAUTIFUL INSIDE AND WAS CONSIDERED IN THOSE DAYS AS A CONSERVATIVE TEMPLE, EVEN THOUGH SOME WOMEN WERE SEGREGATED TO THE BALCONIES. ON CERTAIN HOLIDAYS, AS SMALL TENtET AREA TO THE LEFT OF THE TEMPLE WAS OPENED AND LOOKED LIKE A TREE FOREST. MOST OF THEJEWISH POPULATION LEFT THE AREA IN THE EARLY SIXTIES.


Feedback
Do you know something about this topic? Do you have other pictures or items or knowledge to share? What about a personal story? Are you a collector? Do you have questions? Contact us here.
Created: September 28, 2003   Modified: December 9, 2007