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Partial list of works that may be useful for the study of Dorchester's seventeenth-century history
 Seventeenth Century Bibliography


I. Descriptions of New England available to the English people prior to emigration
II. Reasons for Emigrating
III. Great Migration in General
IV. Colonial Government: the issues of Freemanship and Suffrage
V. Colonial Government in general
VI. The Towns and Town Government
VII. Life in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in the Seventeenth Century
Agriculture
Architecture and Furniture
Churches and Religion
Clothing and Textiles
Economy and Technology
Education and Charity
Land Apportionment
Militia, Firearms, War
Printing
Ships
Sound
Witchcraft
General works on life in Massachusetts in the Seventeenth century




I. Descriptions of New England

Blakeless, John. America as Seen by Its First Explorers: The Eyes of Discovery. New York: Dover, 1961.

Morse, Jarvis M. American Beginnings: Highlights and Sidelights of the Birth of the New World. Washington, D.C.: Public Affairs Press, 1952.

The first 50 pages provides an overview of what Europeans knew of America, including the English. Specifically for our interest the author covers all the works from the publication of Thomas Hariot?s A Briefe and True Report of the New Found Land of Virginia (1589), the first English work describing an area now part of the United States, through the period of the Great Migration. Many of the emigrants would have learned about their new homeland from these works. Some of these are the works by the Hakluyts: Divers Voyages Touching the Discouerie of America (1582), Principall Navigations (1589); by Robert Gray: A Good Speed to Virginia (1609); by Robert Johnson: Nova Brittannia (1609); by Alexander Whitaker: Good Newes from Virginia (1613); by Ralph Hamor: True Discourse (1615); by John Smith: True Relation (1608), A Description of New England (1616), New Englands Trials (1620), The Generall Historie of Virginia, New England, etc. (1624); by William Bradford and Edward Winslow: Mourt?s Relation ((1622); by Edward Winslow: Good Newes from New-England (1623); by Francis Higginson: New-England?s Plantation (1630); by John White: The Planter?s Plea (1630); by William Wood: New Englands Prospect (1634), and others.

Morton, Thomas. New English Canaan. Amsterdam, 1637. facsim reprint Fairfield, WA, 2001.

White, John. John White's Planters Plea 1630. Printed in facsimile with an introduction by Marshall H. Saville. Rockport: The Sandy Bay Historical Society and Museum, 1930.

Winslow, Edward. Good Newes from New England. A True Relation of Things Very Remarkable at the Plantation of Plimoth in New England. Bedford, MA: Applewood Books, 1996. First published 1624.

Wood, William. New England's Prospect. Amherst, 1977. Originally published: London, 1634.




II. Reasons for Emigrating

Adams, James Truslow. The Founding of New England. Boston: Atlantic Monthly Press, 1921. espec. pp. 121-122.

Anderson, Virginia Dejohn. ?Migrants and Motives: Religion and the Settlement of New England, 1630-1640.? The New England Quarterly, Vol. 58, No. 3 (Sep., 1985), pp. 339-383.

The fact that emigrants left England voluntarily and that the period of emigration was of short duration suggests that the reason for emigration was a response to a very specific set of circumstances. Anderson looks at passenger lists for information about the motives for emigration.

Banks, Charles Edward. The Winthrop Fleet of 1630. An Account of the Vessels, the Voyage, the Passengers and their Englsih Homes from Original Authorities. Boston, 1930.

Breen, T.H. and Stephen Foster. ?Moving to the New World: The Character of Early Massachusetts Immigration.? The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, Vol. 30, No. 2 (Apr., 1973), pp. 189-222.

Surviving English customs records for over two thousand of the first settlers of New England, though incomplete and non-representative of the whole of England, may yield conclusions about the types of persons who emigrated prior to the English Civil War and about their motives. The records can shed light on the effect of migration of family structure, vocational patterns and social relationships.

Bridenbaugh, Carl. Vexed and Troubled Englishmen, 1590-1642. New York: Oxford University Press, 1968.

Cressy, David. Coming over: Migration and Communication between England and New England in the Seventeenth Century. New York, 1987.

Explores the various motivations for emigration as well as describing preparations or the voyage.

Cressy, David. ?The Vast and Furious Ocean: The Passage to Puritan New England.? The New England Quarterly, Vol. 57, No. 4. (Dec., 1984), pp. 511-532.

The passage to New England was a passage in several senses of the word. Most passengers were not known to each other, and most had never been on the ocean before. Many approached the trip with apprehension and fear. The trip took on average 8 to 12 weeks, and there was tension between crew and the religious passengers. Emigrants were shocked by the fury of Atlantic storms. The ocean passage became a powerful image in sermons and literature.

French, Allen. Charles I and the Puritan Upheaval: A Study of the Causes of the Great Migration. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin, 1955.

Hansen, Ann Natalie. The Dorchester Group : Puritanism and Revolution. Columbus, OH: At the Sign of the Cock, 1987.

Hansen, Marcus Lee. Atlantic Migration 1607-1860: A History of the Continuing Settlement of the United States. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1940.

Homans, George C. ?The Puritans and the Clothing Industry in England.? The New England Quarterly, Vol. 13, No. 3 (Sep., 1940) pp. 519-529.

Horton, John T. ?Two Bishops and the Holy Brood: A Fresh Look at a Familiar Fact.? The New England Quarterly, Vol. 40, No. 3 (Sep., 1967), pp. 339-363.

The See of Norwich encompassed two counties: Norfolk and Suffolk. The See of Lincoln encompassed a much larger territory: the counties of Lincoln, Leicester, Huntingdon, Bedford, Bucks and a corner of Hertford. But Norwich had twice as many heads of families emigrated as Lincoln. The count of Suffolk alone had 266 heads of families emigrate, while Leicestershire had only 42. Horton explains that the reason is that the Bishop of Lincoln, Dr. John Williams, was much more tolerant of Puritans than the Bishop of Norwich, Matthew Wren.

Morison, Samuel Eliot. Builders of the Bay Colony. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin, 1930.
espec. pp. 340-346.

Notestein, Wallace. The English People on the Eve of Colonization, 1603-1630. New York: Harper Brothers, 1954.

Provides a picture of English Society and institutions on the eve of the Great Migration. Notestein presents the Crown, the Courts and Parliament, the church and the universities, town and country, the lawyer, the physician, the merchant, the aristocracy and the peasantry.

Rogers, Albert R. The Historic Voyage of the Arbella 1630. Official Souvenir of the Arbella. Boston: Massachusetts Tercentenary, 1930.

Rose-Troup, Frances. John White, the Patriarch of Dorchester [Dorset] and the Founder of Massachusetts, 1575-1648. New York: G.P. Putnam?s, 1930.

Rose-Troup, Frances. Massachusetts Bay Company and Its Predecessors. Clifton, NJ: A.M. Kelley, 1973.

Thistlethwaite, Frank. Dorset Pilgrims. The Story of West Country Pilgrims Who Went to New England in the 17th Century. London: Barrie and Jenkins, 1989.

Thompson, Roger. Mobility & Migration: East Anglian Founders of New England, 1629-1640. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1994.




III. Great Migration in General

Ackerman, Arthur W. Reverend John White of Dorchester, England, and his Participation in Founding the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Boston, 1929.

Anderson, Robert Charles. The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-1633. 3 vols. Boston: Great Migration Study Project. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1995.

Anderson, Virginia Dejohn. New England's Generation. The Great Migration and the Formation of Society and Culture in the Seventeenth Century. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1991.

Anderson, Robert Charles and George F. Sanborn, Jr. and Melinde Lutz Sanborn. The Great Migration: Immigrants to New England 1634-1635. In progress, 5 vols. so far. Boston: Great Migration Study Project. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999-

Anderson, Virginia DeJohn Anderson. New England's Generation. The Great Migration and the Formation of Society and Culture in the Seventeenth Century. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1991.

Campbell, Mildred. ?Social Origins of Some Early Americans.? In Seventeenth-Century America: Essays in Colonial History, ed. by James Morton Smith. Chapel Hill, 1959.

The Founding of Massachusetts. A Selection from the Sources of the History of the Settlement, 1628-1631. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 1930.

French, Allen. Charles I and the Puritan Upheaval: A Study of the Causes of the Great Migration. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin, 1955.

The Great Migration: Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635.

Hansen, Marcus Lee. Atlantic Migration 1607-1860: A History of the Continuing Settlement of the United States. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1940.

Thompson, Roger. Mobility & Migration: East Anglian Founders of New England, 1629-1640. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1994.

Young, Alexander. Chronicles of the First Planters of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay, from 1623 to 1636. Boston: Little, Brown, 1846.





IV. Colonial Government: the issues of Freemanship and Suffrage

Brown, B. Katherine. ?A Note on the Puritan Concept of Aristocracy.? The Mississippi Valley Historical Review, Vol. 41, No. 1 (Jun., 1954), pp. 105-112.

Brown, B. Katherine. ?Freemanship in Puritan Massachusetts.? The American Historical Review, Vol. 59, No. 4 (Jul., 1954), pp. 865-883.

Brown, B. Katherine. ?Puritan Democracy: A Case Study.? The Mississippi Valley Historical Review, Vol. 50, No. 3 (Dec., 1963), pp. 377-396.

Brown, B. Katherine. ?Puritan Democracy in Dedham, Massachusetts: Another Case Study.? The William and Mary Quarterly, Vol. 24, No. 3 (Jul., 1967), pp. 378-396.

Foster, Stephen. ?The Massachusetts Franchise in the Seventeenth Century.? The William and Mary Quarterly, Vol. 24, No. 4 (Oct., 1967), pp. 613-623.

Summarizes the history of official acts regarding the making of freemen and explains the inaccuracy of existing lists of freemen.

1630 The Massachusetts General Court first converted freemanship from membership in a joint stock company into the right to vote and hold office in a commonwealth

1631 The General Court restricted freemanship to Church members

1634 The General Court decided that it has the sole authority to make inhabitants freemen

1642 The General Court allowed ?every court in this Jurisdiction, where two magistrates are present: the same right to make freemen. This law gave the power to the colony?s three inferior quarterly courts, which heard lesser civil and criminal cases. These courts became the county courts of Suffolk, Essex and Middlesex counties in 1643

1645 & 1647 The General Court granted the right to make freemen to William Pynchon for the jurisdiction of Springfield. This court became the Hampshire County Court in 1660

1648 A fourth inferior court was added for the southern district of Norfolk

16463 A new voting law continued the church membership requirement but provided as an alternative that some might become freemen if they could show evidence of religious orthodoxy and had enough property to be rateable to the value of ten shillings (there is some debate among historians about the meaning of this figure whether it is the property value or the tax)


The Oath of a Freeman. With a Historical Study by Lawrence C. Wroth and a Note on the Stephen Daye Press by Melbert B. Cary, Jr. New York: Press of the Wooly Whale, 1939.

Simmons, Richard C. ?Freemanship in Early Massachusetts: Some Considerations and a Case Study.? The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, Vol. 19, No. 3 (Jul., 1962), pp. 422-428.

Simmons, Richard C. ?Godliness, Property, and the Franchise in Puritan Massachusetts: An Interpretation.? The Journal of American History, Vol. 55, No. 3 (Dec., 1968), pp. 495-511.

Simmons, Richard Clive. Studies in the Massachusetts Franchise, 1631-1691. Ph.D Dissertation in History, University of California, Berkeley, 1958.

Zuckerman, Michael. ?The Social Context of Democracy in Massachusetts.? The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, Vol. 25, No. 4 (Oct. 1968), pp. 524-544.

Although this article is concerned mostly with the eighteenth century, it does consider the evolving extent of democracy. Zuckerman says democracy was incidental to the prime purposes of provincial society. Democracy was no isolated element in the organization of the political community. In 1630 a band of true believers had entered upon the wilderness? their leaders, in that first generation, proudly proclaimed that they abhorred democracy. The right of every church to keep out the unworthy was precisely the point of the Congregationalists? difference with the established church. The town meeting was no mere forum but the essential element in the delicate equipoise of peace and propriety that governed New England towns. The town meeting aimed at the unanimity of the group.





V. Colonial Government Other than freemanship

Billias, George Athan, editor. Law and Authority in Colonial America: Selected Essays. Barre, MA: Barre Publishers, 1965.

Breen, T.H. The Character of the Good Ruler. Puritan Political Ideas in New England, 1630-1730. New York: W.W. Norton, 1970.

Christian, Mary Blount. Goody Sherman?s Pig. Illustrated by Dirk Zimmer. New York: Macmillan, 1991.

This children?s book showing Sherman as the victim and hero and Robert Keayne as the pure villain, explains the beginnings of the Massachusetts bicameral legislature.

Dalton, Cornelius and John Wirkkala and Anne Thomas. Leading the Way: A History of the Massachusetts General Court, 1629-1980. Boston, 1984.

Haskins, George Lee. Law and Authority in Early Massachusetts. A Study in Tradition and Design. New York: Macmillan, 1960.

Although the Puritans? theory of government was authoritarian, it was also consensual, for they drew upon and developed the theory of social covenant which was well known in the last quarter of the sixteenth century and which viewed government as a compact between ruler and subjects. In the seventeenth century these contractual ideas had been given impetus and general currency in England as a means of combating the prerogative pretensions of James I, but the New England Puritans also found them useful to justify the subordination of individuals to the state. Divine approval of the Christian purposes of the state made the state an emanation of God, and obedience to the common will was therefore also obedience to God. The covenant was a social compact among men and a compact to live righteously and according to God?s word.

McManus, Edgar J. Law and Liberty in Early New England. Criminal Justice and Due Process, 1620-1692. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1993.

Powers, Edwin. Crime and Punishment in Early Massachusetts, 1620-1692: A Documentary History. Boston: Beacon Press, 1966.

Rapaport, Diane. New England Court Records: A Research Guide for Genealogists and Historians. Burlington, MA: Quill Pen Press, 2006.

Records of the Court of Assistants of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay, 1630-1692. Boston, 1901-1928. 3 vols.

Vol. II (1904) has the records from settlement to March 5, 1643-4

Thornton, John Wingate. Landing at Cape Anne; or, The Charter of the First Permanent Colony on the Territory of the Massachusetts Company. Now Discovered and First Published from the Original Manuscript. With an Inquiry into Its Authority and a History of the Colony. Boston: Gould and Lincoln, 1854.

Whitmore, William H. The Massachusetts Civil List for the Colonial and Provincial Periods, 1630-1774. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1969.





VI. The Towns and Town Government (not just Boston, Dorchester and Watertown)

1. Town Records

Dorchester Town Records. Fourth report of the Record Commissioners of the City of Boston. 2nd edition [really 2nd printing]. Boston, 1880.

Dorchester Births, Marriages, and Deaths to the End of 1825. Boston: Rockwell and Churchill, 1891.

First Church (Dorchester, Boston, Mass.) Records of the First Church at Dorchester, in New England, 1636-1734. Boston: G.H. Ellis, 1891.

A Volume Relating to the Early History of Boston Containing the Aspinwall Notarial Records from 1644 to 1651. Boston: Municipal Printing Office,1903.



2. Secondary sources

Adams, Charles Francis and Abner C. Goodell, Jr., Mellen Chamberlain and Edward Channing. The Genesis of the Massachusetts Town, and The Development of Town-Meeting Government. Reprinted from the Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, January, 1892. Cambridge, 1892.

Akagi, Roy Hidemichi. The Town Proprietors of the New England Colonies: A Study of Their Development, Organization, Activities and Controversies, 1620-1770. Gloucester: Peter Smith, 1963.

Allen, David Grayson. In English Ways: the Movement of Societies and the Transferal of English Local Law and Custom to Massachusetts Bay in the Seventeenth Century. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1981.

Anderson, Robert Charles. ?The Mary & John: Developing Objective Criteria for a Synthetic Passenger List.? The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. 147 (1993), pp. 148-61.

Barrows, Samuel J. ?Dorchester in the Colonial Period.? Memorial History of Boston, ed. Justin Winsor . Boston, 1880. Vol 1, pp. 423-438.

Blake, James. Annals of the Town of Dorchester. 1750. Collections of the Dorchester Antiquarian and Historical Society. Number Two. Boston: Dorchester Antiquarian and Historical Society, 1846.

Breen, Timothy H. ?Who Governs: The Town Franchise in Seventeenth-Century Massachusetts.? The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, Vol. 27, No. 3 (Jul., 1970), pp. 460-474.

Examines suffrage laws. In 1636 the General Court authorized the towns to divide their own lands as they saw fit. Local officers collected taxes, recruited and trained the militia, maintained the highways, inspected fences, cared for the poor, recorded vital statistics and organized schools.

Briggs, Martin S. Homes of the Pilgrim Fathers in England and America (1620-1685). New York, 1932.

Channing, Edward. Town and County Government in the English Colonies of North America. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1884.

Clap, Roger. Memoirs of Captain Roger Clap. Relating some of God's Remarkable Providences to Him, in Bringing Him into New England; and Some of the Straits and Afflictions, the Good People Met with Here in Their Beginnings. Boston: W.T. Clap, 1807.

Greven, Philip J., Jr. Four Generations: Population, Land, and Family in Colonial Andover, Massachusetts. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1970.

Hansen, Ann Natalie. English Origins of the "Mary & John" Passengers. Columbus, OH: At the Sign of the Cock, 1985.

Harris, Thaddeus Mason. ?Chronological and Topographical Account of Dorchester.? Massachusetts Historical Society Collections 9 (1804), p. 147-199.

Henretta, James A. ?Economic Development and Social Structure in Colonial Boston. The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, Vol. 22 No. 1 (Jan., 1965), pp. 75-92.

History of the Town of Dorchester, Massachusetts. By a Committee of the Dorchester Antiquarian and Historical Society. Boston: E. Clapp, Jr., 1859.

Kuhns, Maude Pinney. Mary and John; a Story of the Founding of Dorchester, Massachusetts, 1630. Rutland, VT: Tuttle Publishing, 1971.

Lockridge, Kenneth A. and Alan Kreider. ?The Evolution of Massachusetts Town Government, 1640-1740.? The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, Vol 23, No. 4 (Oct., 1966), pp. 549-574.

Lockridge, Kenneth A. A New England Town: The First Hundred Years, Dedham, Massachusetts, 1636-1736. New York: W.W. Norton, 1970.

MacLear, Anne Bush. Early New England Towns: A Comparative Study of Their Development. New York: AMS Press, Inc., 1967

The settlers of Salem, Dorchester, Roxbury, Cambridge, and Watertown did not wait for any grant from the [Massachusetts Bay] company but settled wherever the land seemed best suited for their purposes. Home lots were granted first. These consisted of a plot of ground large enough for a house and out-buildings, a garden, and usually an inclosure for feeding cattle and raising corn. In Dorchester, home lots were usually four acre. Then the arable land and meadow were allotted. The size of these allotments varied greatly not only in different towns but within in the borders of each town. Every settler of Dorchester was given in addition to his home lot ?a great lot? of sixteen to twenty acres, near Neponset river or, when the land there was exhausted, near Roxbury. These great lots were usually meadow land. When there was no more room in these quarters for the assignment of lots, land was granted in different sections of the town so that by 1633 there were five great fields in Dorchester, namely the great lots, the West field, the South field, the East field, and the North field. MacLear goes on to describe the use of forest land, highways, fencing, streams, etc.



Orcutt, William Dana. Good Old Dorchester. A Narrative History of the Town, 1630-1893. Cambridge, 1893.

Powell, Sumner Chilton. Puritan Village: The Formation of a New England Town. Middletown, CT, 1963

Proceedings of theTwo Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of the Gathering in England, Departure for America, and Final Settlement in New England, of the First Church and Parish of Dorchester, Mass. Boston: Geo. H. Ellis, 1880

Rutman, Darrett B. Winthrop?s Boston: Portrait of a Puritan Town, 1630-1649. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press for the Institute of Early American History & Culture, 1965.

Shurtleff, Nathaniel B. Topographical and Historical Description of Boston. Boston: Boston City Council, 1871.

Sly, John Fairfield. Town Government in Massachusetts (1620-1930). Hamden, CT: Archon Books, 1967.

Smith, Page. As a City Upon a Hill: The Town in American History. New York: Alfred. A. Knopf, 1971.

Discusses the importance of the town in America in a wider context than just Colonial Massachusetts. He begins with a description of the covenanted community.

Thompson, Roger. Divided We Stand. Watertown, Massachusetts, 1630-1680. Amherst: University of Masschusetts Press, 2001.

Towns of New England and Old England, Ireland and Scotland. Boston: State Street Trust Company, 1920.

Underdown, David. Fire from Heaven. Life in an English Town in the Seventeenth Century. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1992.

The story of Dorchester, England, in the first half of the seventeenth century, where Rev. John White tried to make a godly commonwealth in old England.

Waters, John J. ?From Democracy to Demography: Recent Historiagraphy on the New England Town.? In Perspectives on Early American History: Essays in Honor of Richard B. Morris. New York: Harper & Row, 1973.

Wood, Joseph S. The New England Village, Baltimore, 1997.

Wood, Joseph S. ?The New England Village as an American Vernacular Form.? Perspectives in Vernacular Architecture, Vol. 2. (1986), pp. 54-63

Zurawski, Carol and Lynn Whitney. Seventeenth Century Survey of Dorchester. Boston: Boston University, 1979.




VII. Life in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in the Seventeenth-Century



Agriculture and Gardens

Anderson, Virginia DeJohn. Creatures of Empire. How Domestic Animals Transformed Early America. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004.

Bidwell, Percy Wells and John I. Falconer. History of Agriculture in the Northern United States, 1620-1860. New York: Peter Smith, 1941.

Bushman, Richard Lyman. ?Markets and Composite Farms in Early America.? The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, Vol. 55, No. 3 (Jul., 1998), pp. 351-374.

Cronon, William. Changes in the Land. Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England. New York: Hill and Wang, 1983.

Earle, Alice Morse. Old-time Gardens Newly Set Forth. New York, Macmillan, 1902.

Friedmann, Karen J. ?Victualling Colonial Boston.? Agricultural History, Vol. 47, No. 3, (Jul., 1973), pp. 189-205.

Boston had outgrown its own food resources by 1640 when the population reached 1200. Boston needs grew even greater as its population grew, but the quantity and variety of foodstuffs that passed through Boston was even more important due to Boston?s role as the port town. Discusses milling, butchering, packing, milking, fishing, markets, etc.

Karsten, Peter. ?Cows in the Corn, Pigs in the Garden, and ?The Problem of Social Costs?: ?High? and ?Low? Legal Cultures of the British Diaspora Lands in the 17th, 18th, and 19th Centuries.? Law and Society Review, Vol. 32, No. 1 (1998), pp. 63-92.

McMahon, Sarah F. ?A Comfortable Subsistence: The Changing Composition of Diet in Rural New England, 1620-1840.? The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, Vol. 42, No. 1 (Jan., 1985), pp. 26-65.

New England's Creatures: 1400-1900. The Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife Annual Proceedings 1993. Boston: Boston University, 1995.

Russell, Howard S. A Long, Deep Furrow. Three Centuries of Farming in New England. Hanover, NH: University Press of New England, 1976.

Rutman, Darrett. ?Governor Winthrop's Garden Crop: The Significance of Agriculture in the Early Commerce of Massachusetts Bay.? The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, Vol. 20, No. 3. (Jul., 1963), pp. 396-415.

Trade and agriculture could not have existed without each other. IN the 1630s the flood of immigrants created a demand for commodities, but in 1640 with the cessation of immigration, prices plummeted leaving the settlers with an unsaleable agricultural surplus. The solution was finding customers abroad. In the years immediately following, trade in agricultural products grew quickly to major proportions.

Shammas, Carole. ?How Self-Sufficient was Earl America?? Journal of Interdisciplinary History, Vol. 13, No. 2 (Autumn, 1982), pp. 247-272.

Walcott, Robert R. ?Husbandry in Colonial New England.? The New England Quarterly, Vol. 9, No. 2 (Jun., 1936), pp. 218-252.




Architecture & Furniture

Benes, Peter and Phillip Zimmerman. New England Meeting House and Church: 1630-1850. The Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife 1979. Boston: Boston University, 1979.

Briggs, Martin S. The Homes of the Pilgrim Fathers in England and America (1620-1685). New York: Oxford University Press, 1932.

Includes a chapter on Timber Houses in New England c. 1635-c. 1685, covering portions of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and not just Pilgrim territory.

Cummings, Abbott Lowell, ed. Architecture in Colonial Massachusetts. A Conference held by the Colonial Society of Massachusetts, September 19th and 20th, 1974. Boston: The Colonial Society of Massachusetts, 1979.

Cummings, Abbot Lowell. Architecture in Early New England. Sturbridge: Old Sturbridge Village, 1974.

Cummings, Abbott Lowell. The Framed houses of Massachusetts Bay, 1625-1725. Cambridge, 1979.

Cummings, Abbott Lowell. ?Three Hearths: A Socioarchitectural Study of Seventeenth-Century Massachusetts Bay Probate Inventories.? Old-Time New England, Vol. 75 No. 263 (1997) p. 5-49

Forbes, Harriette M. ?Some Seventeenth-Century Houses of Middlesex County, Massachusetts.? Old-Time New England, January, 1939.

Isham, Norman Morrison. Early American Houses: The Seventeenth Century. Watkins Glen, NY: American Life Foundation, 1968.

Kimball, Fiske. Domestic Architecture of the American Colonies and of the Early Republic. New York: Scribner, 1922.

Nutting, Wallace. Furniture of the Pilgrim Century, 1620-1720. Including Colonial Utensils and Hardware. New York: Bonanza, 1921.




Churches/Religion

Beales, Ross W., Jr. ?The Half-Way Covenant and Religious Scrupulosity: the First Church of Dorchester, Massachusetts, As a Test.? The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, Vol. 31, No. 3 (Jul., 1974), pp. 465-580.

Bremer, Francis J. The Puritan Experiment: New England Society from Bradford to Edwards. Hanover: University Press of New England, 1995.

Bremer, Franics J. Puritanism. Transatlantic Perspectives on a Seventeenth-Century Anglo-American Faith. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 1993.

Bremer, Francis J. Shaping New Englands: Puritan Clergymen in Seventeenth-century England and New England. New York: Twayne, 1995.

Burg, B.R. Richard Mather of Dorchester. Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1976.

Cohen, Charles Lloyd. God's Caress. The Psychology of Puritan Religious Experience. New York: Harvard University Press, 1986.

Delbanco, Andrew. The Puritan Ordeal. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1989.

Donnelly, Marian Card. The New England Meeting Houses of the Seventeenth Century. Middletown: Wesleyan University Press, 1968.

Elliott, Emory. Power and the Pulpit in Puritan New England. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1975.

Foster, Stephen. Their Solitary Way: the Puritan Social Ethic in the First Century of Settlement in New England. New Haven, 1971.

Godbeer, Richard. The Devil's Dominion: Magic and Religion in Early New England. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1994.

Gura, Philip F. A Glimpse of Sion's Glory. Puritan Radicalism in New England, 1620-1660. Middleton: Wesleyan University Press, 1984.

Hall, David D. The Antinomian Controversy, 1636-1638. A Documentary History. Middletown: Wesleyan University Press, 1968.

Hall, David D. Faithful Shepherd. A History of the New England Ministry in the Seventeenth Century. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1972.

Hall, David D. Worlds of Wonder, Days of Judgment. Popular Religious Belief in Early New England. New York: Knopf, 1989.

Hambrick-Stowe, Charles E. The Practice of Piety: Puritan Devotional Disciplines in Seventeenth-Century New England. Chapel Hill: North Carolina University Press, 1982.

Levy, Babette May. Preaching in the First Half Century of New England History. Hartford: The American Society of Church History, 1945.

Mather, Increase. Life and Death of That Reverend Man of God, Mr. Richard Mather, Teacher of the Church of Dorchester in New England. Bainbridge, NY: York Mail-Print, 1974.

Mather, Richard. Journal of Richard Mather. 1635. His life and death. 1670. Boston, 1850.

Middlekauf, Robert. The Mathers: Three Generations of Puritan Intellectuals, 1596-1728. New York: Oxford Universtiry Press, 1971.

Miller, Perry. Errand into the Wilderness. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1956.

Miller, Perry. Nature's Nation. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1967.

Miller, Perry. The New England Mind: From Colony to Province. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1953.

Miller, Perry. New England Mind: The Seventeenth Century. Boston: Beacon Press, 1968.

Miller, Perry. Orthodoxy in Massachusetts, 1630-1650. Gloucester: Peter Smith, 1965.

Miller, Perry and Thomas H. Johnson. The Puritans. New York: American Book Company, 1938.

Morgan, Edmund S. Visible Saints: The History of a Puritan Idea. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1963.

Oberholzer, Emil, Jr. ?The Church in New England Society.? In Seventeenth-Century America: Essays in Colonial History, ed. by James Morton Smith. Chapel Hill, 1959.

Oberholzer, Emil. ?Puritanism Revisited.? In Perspectives on Early American History: Essays in Honor of Richard B. Morris. New York: Harper & Row, 1973.

Pope, Robert G. The Half-Way Covenant. Church Membership in Puritan New England. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1969.

Pope, Robert G. ?New England Versus the New England Mind: The Myth of Declension.? Journal of Social History, Vol. 3, No. 2 (Winter, 1969-70), pp. 95-108.

Rutman, Darrett B. ?God?s Bridge Falling Down: ?Another Approach? to New England Puritanism Assayed.? The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, Vol. 13, No. 3, (Jul., 1962), pp. 408-421.

Stout, Harry S. The New England Soul. Preaching and Religious Culture in Colonial New England. New York: Oxford University Press, 1986.

Walker, Williston. The Creeds and Platforms of Congregationalism. New York: Pilgrim Press, 1991.

Includes the Cambridge Platform.

Winship, Michael P. Making Heretics: Militant Protestantism and Free Grace in Massachusetts, 1636-1641. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2002.

Winship, Michael P. The Times & Trials of Anne Hutchinson. Lawrence: University of Kansas Press, 2005.

Winslow, Ola. Meetinghouse Hill, 1630-1783. New York: Macmillian, 195




Clothing and Textiles

Earle, Alice Morse. Customs and Fashions in Old New England. New York: Scribner?s, 1893.

Linen-making in New England, 1640-1860. North Andover: Merrimack Valley Textile Museum, 1980.

Swan, Susan Barrows. Plain & Fancy: American Women and Their Needlework, 1650-1850. Austin: Curious Works Press, 1995.

Wilcox, R. Turner. Five Centuries of American Costume. Mineola: Dover, 2004.



Disease

Duffy, John. Epidemics in Colonial America. Port Washington, NY: Kennikat Press, 1972.


Economy and Technology

Andrews, Kenneth R. Trade, plunder and settlement: maritime enterprise and the genesis of the British Empire, 1480-1630. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1984.

Bailyn, Bernard. New England Merchants in the Seventeenth Century. New York: Harper & Row, 1955.

Barrow, Thomas C. Trade & Empire: The British Customs Service in Colonial America, 1660-1775. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1967.

Bedini, Silvio A. Thinkers and Tinkers: Early American Men of Science. New York: Scribner, 1975.

Includes material about John Foster, Dorchester engraver and Boston printer.

Carroll, Charles F. The Timber Economy of Puritan New England. Providence: Brown University, 1973.

Davis, Ralph. The Rise of the Atlantic Economies. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1973.

Surveys the economic history of the countries on the western fringe of Europe and of the colonies they established, or had dealings with, in North and South America, from the beginnings of Portuguese discovery in the fifteenth century to the American Revolution.

Dorfman, J. The Economic Mind in American Civilization, 1606-1865. 1946.


Hindle, Brooke. Technology in Early America: Needs and Opportunities for Study. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press for the Institute of Early American History and Culture, 1966.

Provides a bibliographical overview of the published work up to the time of publication.

Hunter, Phyllis Whitman. Purchasing Identity in the Atlantic World: Massachusetts Merchants, 1670-1780. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2001.

Innes, Stephen. Creating the Commonwealth: The Economic Culture of Puritan New England. New York: Norton, 1955.

Innes, Stephen, ed. Work and Labor in Early America. Chapel Hill: Institute of Early American History and Culture, University of North Carolina, 1988.

Martin, John Frederick. Profits in the Wilderness: Entrepreneurship and the Founding of New England Towns in the Seventeenth Century. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1991.

McCusker, John J. and Russell R. Menard. Economy of British America, 1607-1789. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1985.

McGaw, Judith A., ed. Early American Technology: Making & Doing Things from the Colonial Era to 1850. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1994.

McWilliams, James E. Building the Bay Colony: Local Economy and Culture in Early Massachusetts. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2007.

Newell, Margaret Ellen. From Dependency to Independence: Economic Revolution in Colonial New England. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1998.

Smith, Alan G.R. Science and Society in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. New York: Science History Publications, 1972.

Vickers, Daniel. ?Competency and Competition: Economic Culture in Early America .? The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Ser., Vol. 47, No. 1. (Jan., 1990), pp. 3-29.

To express a degree of well-being that was both desirable and morally legitimate, early modern Englishmen often chose the term competency. The idea connoted the possession of sufficient property to absorb the labors of a given family while providing it with something more than a mere subsistence. It meant a comfortable independence.

Weedon, William B. Economic and Social History of New England, 1620-1789. In Two Volumes. New York: Hillary House Publishers, 1963.




Education and Charity

Axtell, James. The School Upon a Hill: Education and Society in Colonia New England. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1974.

Presents a comprehensive treatment from a child?s weaning, to catechism, to choosing a calling, to apprenticeship, to the well-ordered family, to the responsibility for publicly-funded education.

Cremin, Lawrence A. American Education. The Colonial Experience, 1607-1783. New York: Harper & Row, 1970.

Jackson, George Leroy. Development of School Support in Colonial Massachusetts. New York: Columbia University, 1909.

Kelso, Robert W. The History of Public Poor Relief in Massachusetts, 1620-1920. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin, 1922.

Littlefield, George Emery. Early Schools and School-Books of New England. New York: Russell and Russell, 1965.

Lockridge, Kenneth A. Literacy in Colonial New England: An Enquiry into the Social Context of Literacy in the Early Modern West. New York: Norton, 1974.

Small, Walter Herbert. Early New England Schools. Boston: Ginn and Company, 1914.

Updegraff, Harlan. The Origin of the Moving School in Massachusetts. New York: Arno Press & The New York Times, 1969.

Treats intensively the subject of school control in Massachusetts from the time of settlement to the first decades of the eighteenth century.



Land Apportionment

Egleston, Melville. The Land System of the New England Colonies. 1880.




Militia, Firearms, War

Bodge, George Madison. Soldiers in King Philip's War: Being a Critical Account of That War, with a Concise History of the Indian Wars of New England from 1620-1677. Boston, 1906.

Drake, James D. King Philip's War. Civil War in New England, 1675-1676. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1999.

Kawashima, Yasuhide. Igniting King Philip's War. The John Sassamon Murder Trial. University of Kansas Press, 2001.

Markham, Richard. A Narrative History of King Philip's War and the Indian Troubles in New England. New York: Dodd, Mead, 1883.

Peterson, Harold L. Arms and Armor in Colonial America, 1526-1783. Mineola, NY: Dover, 2000.

Sawyer, Charles Winthrop. Firearms in American History, 1600 to 1800. Boston, 1910.

Schultz, Eric B. and Michael J. Tougias. King Philip's War. The History and Legacy of America's Forgorten Conflict. Woodstock, VT: The Countryman Press, 1999.

Shy, John W. ?A New Look at Colonial Militia.? The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, Vol. 20, No. 2 (Apr., 1963), pp. 176-185.

Silver, Peter. Our Savage Neighbors: How Indian War Transformed Early America. New York: W.W. Norton, 2008.




Printing

Green, Samuel Abbott. John Foster: the Earliest American Engraver and the First Boston Printer. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 1909.

Littlefield, George Emery. The Early Massachusetts Press, 1638-1711. In Two Volumes. Boston, The Club of Odd Volumes, 1907.





Ships

Baker, William A. Colonial Vessels: Some Seventeenth-Century Sailing Craft. Barre, MA: Barre Publishing Company, 1962.

Robinson, John and George Francis Dow. The Sailing Ships of New England, 1607-1907. Westminster, MD: J. William Eckenrode, 1953.


Sound

American Speech: 1600 to the Present. The Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife Annual Proceedings 1983. Boston: Boston University, 1985.

New England Music: The Public Sphere, 1600-1900. The Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife Annual Proceedings 1996. Boston: Boston University, 1998.

Rath, Richard Cullen. How Early America Sounded. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2003.




Witchcraft

Demos, John Putnam. Entertaining Satan. Witchcraft and the Culture of Early New England. New York: Oxford University Press, 1982.


Hall, David D. Witch-Hunting in Seventeenth-Century New England: A Documentary History, 1638-1692. Boston, 1991.



General works illuminating life in Massachusetts in the Seventeenth Century with a few works about life in England prior to emigration

Andrews, Charles M. Colonial Folkways. A Chronicle of American Life in the Reign of the Georges. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1919.

Andrews, Charles M. The Colonial Period of American History. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1964.

v. 1 The Settlements, v.2 The Settlements, v. 3 The Settlements, v. 4 England's Commercial and Colonial Policy

Andrews, Charles M. Our Earliest Colonial Settlements. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1964.

Armitage, David, ed. British Atlantic World, 1500-1800. New York: Palgrave, Macmillan, 2002.

Bond, Beverly W., Jr. The Quit-Rent System in the American Colonies. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1919.

Breen, T.H.. Puritans and Adventurers: Change and Persistence in Early America. New York, Oxford University Press, 1980.

Chapter III: Moving to the New World; Chapter IV: Transfer of Culture.

Breen, Timothy H. and Stephen Foster. ?The Puritans' Greatest Achievement: A Study of Social Cohesion.? The Journal of American History, Vol. 670, No. 1. (Jun., 1973), pp. 5-22.
Historians have ignored the Bay Colony?s most startling accomplishment?fifty years of relative peace. Political chaos was the rule in the seventeenth century until one looks at New England. Congregationalism was a source stability, accommodating moderate differences of opinion while detecting and expelling extremists. The result was the absence of internal organized violence.

Bremer, Francis J. John Winthrop. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003.

Bridenbaugh, Carl . Cities in the Wilderness: The First Century of Urban Life in America, 1625-1742. New York: Knopf, 1955.

Describes life in colonial America as it developed under urban conditions covering physical, economic, social and cultural aspects of Boston, Newport, New York, Philadelphia and Charles Town.

Bushman, Richard L. King and People in Provincial Massachusetts. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1992.

Cassedy, James, H. Demography in Early America: Beginnings of the Statistical Mind, 1600-1800. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1969.

Chapin, Bradley. Criminal Justice in Colonial America, 1606-1660. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1983.

Chapin, Bradley. Provincial America, 1600-1763. New York: Free Press, 1966.

Clark, Alice. Working Life of Women in the Seventeenth Century. London: Routledge and K. Paul, 1982.

Clark, Charles E. The Eastern Frontier: The Settlement of Northern New England, 1610-1763. New York: Knopf, 1970

Dow, George Francis. Domestic Life in New England in the Seventh Century. A Discourse Delivered in the Lecture Hall of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. Topsfield, MA, 1925.

Dow, George Francis. Every Day Life in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Boston: The Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities, 1935.

Dunn, Richard S. Puritans and Yankees: The Winthrop Dynasty of New England, 1630-1717. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1962.

Earle, Alice Morse. Child Life in Colonial Days. New York: Macmillan, 1899.

Earle, Alice Morse. Home Life in Colonial Days. New York: Macmillan, 1899.

Emerson, Everett, ed. Letters from New England. The Massachusetts Bay Colony, 1629-1638. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1976.

Fagan, Brian. The Little Ice Age. How Climate Made History, 1300-1850. [s.l.], 2000

Fairbanks, Jonathan and Robert Trent. New England Begins. 3 vols. Boston: Museum of Fine Arts, 1982.

Fischer, David Hackett. Albion's Seed. Four British Folkways in America. New York: Oxford University Press, 1989.

Foster, Stephen. Their SolitaryWay: the Puritan Social Ethic in the First Century of Settlement in New England. New Haven, 1971.

Freeman, Victoria. Distant Relations. How My Ancestors Colonized North America. Toronto: McClelland and Stuart, 2000.

Includes description of relations with native Americans and King Philip's War in 17th century.

Godbeer, Richard. Sexual Revolution in Early America. Baltimore, 2002.

Greene, Evarts B. American Population Before the Federal Census of 1790. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1981.

Greene, Jack P. The Intellectual Construction of America. Exceptionalism and identity from 1492 to 1800. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1993.

Henretta, James A. and Gregory H. Nobles. Evolution and Revolution: American Society, 1600-1820. Lexington, MA: D.C. Heath, 1987.

Henretta, James A. ?Families and Farms: Mentalite in Pre-Industrial America.? The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series., No. 1 (Jan., 1978), pp. 3-32.

Although dealing more with the eighteenth-century than the seventeenth, this article asks about the relationship between the structures of social existence and the consciousness of the inhabitants, the mental or emotional ideological aspects of their lives. Can a careful statistical analysis of their patterns of social action suggest conclusions as to their motivations, values and goals?

Hoffer, Peter C. and N.E. H. Hull Murdering Mothers: Infanticide in England and New England, 1558-1803. New York: New York University Press, 1984.

Hubbard, William. General History of New England, from the Discovery to MDCLXXX. New York: Arno Press, 1972.

Hull, N.E.H. Female Felons: Women and Serious Crime in Colonial Massachusetts. Urbana: University of Illinois, 1987.

Innes, Stephen. Labor in a New Land: Economy and Society in Seventeenth-Century Springfield. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1983.

Jernegan, Marcus Wilson. Laboring and Dependent Classes in Colonial America, 1607-1783. New York: Frederick Ungar, 1965.

Johnson, Herbert Alan. American Colonial Legal History: A Historiographical Interpretation.? In Perspectives on Early American History: Essays in Honor of Richard B. Morris. New York: Harper & Row, 1973.

Koehler, Lyle. A Search for Power: The "Weaker Sex" in Seventeenth-Century New England. Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1980.

Kolchin, Peter. American Slavery, 1619-1877. New York: Hill & Wang, 2003.

Konig, David Thomas. Law and Society in Puritan Massachusetts, Essex County, 1629-1692. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1979.

Kupperman, Karen Ordahl. Settling with the Indians. The meeting of English and Indian cultures in America, 1580-1640. London, 1980.

Laslett, Peter. The World We Have Lost: England Before the Industrial Age. Third Edition. New York: Scribner?s, 1984.

Main, Gloria L. ?An Inquiry into When and Why Women Learned to Write in Colonial New England.? Journal of Social History, Vol. 24, No. 3. (Spring, 1991), pp. 579-589

Main, Gloria L. ?Gender, Work, and Wages in Colonial New England.? The William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd Ser., Vol. 51, No. 1. (Jan., 1994), pp. 39-66.

Main, Gloria L. ?Naming Children in Early New England.? The Journal of Interdisciplinary History. Vol. 26, No. 1 (Summer 1996), pp. 1-27

Main, Gloria L. Peoples of a Spacious Land: Families and Cultures in Colonial New England. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2001.

Discusses adaptation to a new environment including description of the contours of the land, the quality of the topsoil, small-scale gardeining, the Little Ice-Age, clearing the land, sexuality, child-bearing, etc.

Main, Gloria L. ?The Standard of Living in Southern New England, 1640-1773.? The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Ser., Vol. 45, No. 1 (Jan., 1988), pp 124-134.

Main, Gloria L. ?The Standard of Living in Colonial Massachusetts.? The Journal of Economic History, Vol. 43, No. 1, The Tasks of Economic History. (Mar., 1983), pp. 101-108

Material Life in America, 1600-1860. Boston: Northeastern University Press, 1988.

Meserole, Harrison T., editor. Seventeenth-Century American Poetry. New York: New York University Press, 1968.

Mintz, Steven and Susan Kellogg. Domestic Revolutions: A Social History of American Family Life. New York: The Free Press (Macmillan), 1988.

Mitchell, Patricia B. Colonial Foodways: Pilgrims, Puritans, and Cavaliers, From Hunger to Feasting. Self-published, 1999.

Moller, Herbert. ?Sex Composition and Correlated Culture Patterns of Colonial America.? The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, Vol. 2, No. 2 (Apr., 1945), pp. 114-153.

Morgan, Edmund S. The Puritan Dilemma: The Story of John Winthrop. Boston: Little, Brown, 1958.

The chapter entitled Seventeenth-Century Nihilism provides a concise summary of the Antinomian Crisis.

Morgan, Edmund S. The Puritan Family. Essays on Religion and Domestic Relations in Seventeenth-Century New England. Boston: Trustees of the Boston Public Library, 1956.
And later editions.

Morris, Richard B. Government and Labor in Early America. New York: Octagon Books, 1975.

Nissenbaum, Stephen W. Christmas in early New England, 1620-1820: Puritanism, Popular Culture and the Printed Word. Worcester: American Antiquarian Society, 1996. Reprinted from the Proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society, Vol. 106, Part 1.

Reprinted from the Proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society, Vol. 106, part 1

Osgood, Herbert L. The American Colonies in the Seventeenth Century. Gloucester: Peter Smith, 1957.

Pathways of the Puritans. Compiled under the direction of the Massachusetts Bay Colony Tercentenary Commission and published by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 2nd ed. Boston, 1931.

Phillips, James Duncan. Salem in the Seventeenth Century. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin, 1933.

Quimby, Ian M.G., ed. Arts of the Anglo-American Community in the Seventeenth Century. Twentieth Annual Winterthur Conference Report 1974. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia for The Henry Francis du Pont Winterthur Museum, 1975.

Rapaport, Diane. The Naked Quaker. True Crimes and Controvesies from the Courts of Colonial New England. Beverly, MA: Commonwealth Editions, 2007.

Ryan, Mary P. Womanhood in America from Colonial Times to the Present. New York: Franklin Watts, 1983.

St. George, Robert Blair. Conversing by Signs. Poetics of Implication in Colonial New England Culture. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1998.

St. George, Robert Blair. Material Life in America, 1600-1860. Boston: Northeastern University Press, 1988.

Salinger, Sharon V. Taverns and Drinking in Early America. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2002.

Seventeenth-century New England. Papers from a conference in 1982. Boston: The Colonial Society of Massachusetts, 1984.

Shryock, Richard Harrison. Medicine and Society in America, 1660-1860. New York: New York University Press, 1960.

Smith, Daniel Scott. ?The Demographic History of Colonial New England.? The Journal of Economic History, Vol. 32, No. 1, The Tasks of Economic History. (Mar., 1972), pp. 165-183

Smith, James Morton, ed. Seventeenth-Century America: Essays on Colonial History. Published for the Institute of Early American History and Culture at Williamsburg, Virginia. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1959.

Smith, Page. Daughters of the Promised Land: Women in American History. Boston: Little, Brown, 1970.

Staloff, Darren. The Making of An American Thinking Class: Intellectuals & Intelligentsia in Puritan Massachusetts. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.

The Dorchester Company of Adventurers, the first organized effort to colonize Massachusetts Bay failed in 1626 due to bad luck and lack of capital. John Humfrey and Rev. John White made overtures to more well-to-do eastern Puritans. The transformation of the projected colony from a source of mercantile profit to a holy commonwealth was the result of a dramatic shift of power within the Massachusetts colonization movement. In the late summer of 1629, a group of well-organized East Anglian Puritan intelligentsia, with the aid of ministerial intellections and a handful of sympathetic merchants, seized control of the Massachusetts Bay Company. This power grab was perhaps the single most important event in the political history of Puritan Massachusetts.

Stavely, Keith. America's Founding Food. The Story of New England Cooking. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2004.

Stevenson, Noel C. ?Marital Rights in the Colonial Period.? New England Historic Genealotical Register, CIX (1955), p. 84-91.

Stilgoe, John R. Common Landscape of America, 1580 to 1845. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1982.

Thompson, Roger. Cambridge Cameos. Stories of Life in Seventeenth-Century New England. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2005.

Thompson, Roger. Sex in Middlesex: Popular Mores in a Massachusetts County, 1649-1699. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1989.

Ulrich, Laurel Thatcher. Good Wives. Image and Reality in the Lives of Women in Northern New England, 1650-1750. New York: Vintage, 1991.

Vaughan, Alden T. New England Frontier: Puritans and Indians, 1620-1675. Boston: Little, Brown, 1965.

Vickers, Daniel. Farmers & Fishermen: Two Centuries of Work in Essex County, Massachusetts, 1630-1830. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina, 1994.

Vowell, Sarah. The Wordy Shipmates. New York: Riverhead Books, 2008.
Cleverly-worded, irreverent re-telling of the story of the first years of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and its treatment of dissenters and native Americans.

Wall, Robert Emmet, Jr. Massachusetts Bay: the Crucial Decade, 1640-1650. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1982.

Weis, Frederick Lewis. The Colonial Clergy and the Colonial Churches of New England. Lancaster, MA, 1936.

Wertenbaker, Thomas Jefferson. The Puritan Oligarchy: The Founding of American Civilization. New York: Scribners, 1947.

In the first two chapters Wertenbaker compares many aspects of life in East Anglia prior to emigration to life in Colonial New England. The book concludes that Puritanism found its truest expression, not in England, but in New England. The true Puritan state was established there with all its distinctive features?congregations whose autonomy was derived from a covenant with God, a civil government in which only church members participated, an educational system designed to buttress the orthodox religion, a rigid code of morals, the suppression of heresy.

Winthrop, John. History of New England from 1630 to 1649. New York: Arno Press, 1972.

Women's Work in New England, 1620-1920. The Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife Annual Proceedings 2001. Boston: Boston University, 2003.

Wonders of the Invisible World: 1600-1900. The Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife Annual Proceedings 1992. Boston: Boston University, 1995.

Worlds of Children, 1620-1920. The Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife Annual Proceedings 2002. Boston: Boston University, 2004.

Wrightson, Keith. English Society, 1580-1680. London: Hutchinson, 1982.


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