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Lamont Price
Lamont Price
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 Lamont Price is a Dorchester native.

Local comedian Lamont Price firmly in the clouds

artice that appeared in The Boston Globe, May 15, 2012

WHO

Lamont Price

WHAT

Price, 29 (he says heís ď22 in HollywoodĒ), a Dorchester native, was recently named one of Comedy Centralís ďComedians to Watch.Ē We caught up with the afro-sporting, Connect 4-playing ladiesí man to check in on his recent success and hear about his serious plans for the future.

Q. How did you get into comedy?

A. When I was 17, my friend gave me this pamphlet on a workshop. It was a six-week-long class that culminated in a show at the Comedy Studio in Harvard Square, a venue I still frequent today. Itís one of the greatest clubs. Before it was like, ďI want to try it,Ē but once I actually did it, it felt right and I knew that this is where I was supposed to be.

Q. What all does a comedian do?

A. Comediansí lives consist of Connect 4, video games, and watching cartoons all day. Maybe that means Iím a comedian; maybe that means I never progressed past 15. But the technical aspect of what we do is observe. We see what you see, but we look immediately at what is funny. Weíll be hanging out and see an old lady. You might say thatís a cute old lady. And I think how funny it would be if she tripped. Itís not even something you have to turn on, itís just there. Thatís a winded way to say weíre lazy.

Q. Besides little old ladies, where do you draw inspiration from?

A. A lot of what goes on in society. . . . Youíll hear me talk in depth about the presidential campaign and then in the next conversation Iíll discuss a man marrying his goat and how awesome a wedding that would be to attend. So it runs the gamut. I also do watch a lot of cartoons, and my imagination is insane. My feet are in reality but my head is firmly in the clouds.

Q. What put you on the radar for Comedy Central?

A. One of the clubs I perform at is a comedy studio that has a huge national notoriety, and that gave me light. I got seen by this one comedy company called Rooftop Comedy. So there was a lot of exposure and I started going to comedy festivals.

Q. How has the title affected your dating life?

A. Girls always say, ďI like funny guys. I like guys with a spontaneous personality.Ē Iím a professional that guy, so all I have to do is pretend that Iím charming. No, but really, I donít immediately mention that Iím the next big thing. I wait until itís going terribly wrong and then I throw a Hail Mary: ďComedy Central!Ē

Q. Do people recognize you?

A. Sometimes. I mean, Iím not famous, but there are people that have noticed me from things ó commercials and stuff. So I get slightly recognized. But people see me as Lamont Price the comedian, not Lamont Price that doesnít call girls back immediately. The key to comedy is to be personable. I like to shake hands and kiss babies. Iím always running for president.

Q. I hear your afro is pretty incredible.

A. Itís low maintenance. I have a very reliable pick. I call him Herb, my trusty pick Herb; heís been with me for six years. Having an afro is like having a superpower. I do clothe the homeless by day, and I save children from burning buildings on the weekends. Iím a superhero. I can fly but only on Thursdays. Thatís the deal I made with the afro fairy. . . . But it sucks when people have a better afro than mine. Someone comes in with a better one and all of a sudden Iím Clark Kent again. I hate being Clark Kent.

Q. Youíre doing a couple of upcoming shows in Boston.

A. On May 17, Iím doing a show at this new space called Red Star Union. Then May 18, I have a couple of shows. The first is at Grandmaís Basement inside the Howard Johnson in Fenway. But after the show, there will be no hand-shaking, no baby-kissing, no phone number-getting, no sizing up girlsí booties. I have to get out of there because Iím on at 11 at Davis Square Theatre for a show.

Q. And what about long-term goals?

A. I want to act. Iíve done a couple of independent movies that no one will ever see. Iíve already auditioned for some things. I obviously didnít get them, but Iím on the radar. So in the future, Iíd definitely like to stick my toe into acting. Even serious stuff. I can make a serious face, but that might just be funny looking. I want to cry for a role. I want my crying to be on screen. Thatís my new goal.

Marian Daniells can be reached at marian.daniells@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @marian
daniells.



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Created: July 1, 2012   Modified: July 1, 2012